Monthly Archives: April 2020

I Honor. – A Challenge to Myself

Power.
You can use it to empower
You can abuse it to dismantle
It is a fine line yet a huge difference

The key to empowerment
Does it lie in education or financial support
Or is it more of an inner characteristic
A value of how we treat others
The selfless act of honor?

Honor doesn’t ask for authorization
Honor doesn’t say I have power, you don’t
Honor doesn’t request perfection

More than anything

Striving against the odds

Channa 2 A petite woman standing in the middle of some rough villagers, her fine voice giving instructions about what was to be done. The sun is barely over the horizon. Her sleeves covering up to the fingertips, with lots of confidence she points at where the soil is supposed to be moved to. I am mesmerized by her determination. As one of her first tasks at ICF Cambodia Channa was asked to help me with translation on the construction site – which is not much more than a hole and some heaps of soil back in 2015. Surely, if someone told her some weeks ago she’d end up on construction, she would’ve playfully slapped that person.

In fact, I always wanted to become a florist, a broadcaster on TV or an ambassador for the country. My dreams were inspired by movies and my relatives who pushed me towards a career that would make some serious money, hopefully. My strict parents raised me and my three brothers with the main focus on education. Besides going to school there was no reason to leave the house. Not even playing with the neighbors was really allowed.

Consequences of Hope and Trust

Chamroeun 2 Born about 30 years ago in the province of Siem Reap, Chamroeun grew up with five siblings around rice fields, cows and water buffaloes. His parents were farmers at first, then worked on construction and at the market after they had sold their land. More than anything, they were survival artists. Within his many relatives, there are stories of human trafficking and such despair that one relative even was left for adoption into France and just recently “found” again – thanks to prayer and Facebook.

I know Chamroeun as an especially loyal, enduring person. From working in my team – a long time ago – he has become my brother who has an outstanding gift of empathy. He knows me well, somehow he always knows where I’m at. Often, he sends me short encouraging text messages at the perfect time. Sometimes I wonder how that farming child turned into a highly successful caseworker.